Hints about soybeans

  • History of Soy :
    Soybeans are grown in China for more than three millennia where their food has become fundamental. In the seventh century AD, soybean cultivation spread to Japan. Europe is not reached until a thousand years later, that is, until the seventeenth century. In the early nineteenth century began to grow in the U.S. However, in Europe and North America, soy was not used in food until well into the twentieth century. The United States currently produces half of all global soy, but despite that soy consumption is still very low in Western countries. Numerous studies have confirmed that this is precisely the soybeans, which many Japanese, Chinese and Koreans consumed daily, the head of his better reproductive health and their lower rate of breast cancer and prostate cancer. This is consistent with one of the major findings of modern epidemiology: the more dependent on good health habits, especially the food type, that genetic or hereditary factor.
  • Properties of Soy :
    The soybean is possibly the largest natural food with protein, unsaturated fats, vitamins and minerals. In addition, soy also contains valuable phytochemicals. Their ability to nurture and to prevent disease is best understood by knowing its composition:
  • Protein :
    Soy is the richest food in proteins of those offered by nature as it contains 36.5%, meat with less than 20% and 12.5% and eggs are far behind. But in addition to quantity, quality soy offers. Its protein amino acids meet the needs of our body, whether it is adults and children, so it is highly recommended in the latter. Only recommended as a precautionary measure, that the formulas based on soy milk for infants be supplemented with essential amino acid methionine. Experiments at the National Agricultural Research Institute French have shown that soy proteins are digested and absorbed as easily as those of cow's milk.
  • Fats :
    Unlike other legumes such as beans or lentils, which contain less than 1%, soy comes to 19.9% fat, mainly composed of: unsaturated fatty acids such as Omega 6 (55%), Omega 3 (9% ) and oleic (21%), a small proportion of saturated such as palmitic (9%) and stearic (6%). For unsaturated fatty acids predominate, fat soy helps reduce cholesterol. Fat soybean oil is obtained widely used in food.
  • Lecithin :
    It is a lipid complex which forms part of the fat from soy and it works very well in the treatment of cardiovascular disease and high cholesterol levels or imbalances between good and bad cholesterol (HDL / LDL). Many scientific studies link consumption of lecithin with reduced plasma cholesterol and increased HDL (good) 46%.
  • Carbohydrates :
    They account for 20.9% of their weight, unlike other legumes such as lentils, beans, green soybeans or azuki are richer in starch, soy only contains it. This makes it very well tolerated by diabetics.
  • Vitamins :
    100 g of soybean account for over half the daily requirement of vitamin B1 and B2, and a fifth (20%) of Vitamin B6 and Vitamin E.
  • Minerals :
    Soy contains a high concentration of minerals, so that 100 g add 15.7 mg of iron, five times more than the meat, an amount amply supplies of this mineral daily requirements for an adult male. Soy is also rich in phosphorus, magnesium and potassium, 100g cover almost all the daily needs of this mineral. It is also quite rich in calcium and good source of copper, zinc and manganese. By contrast, soybean has the advantage of only contain sodium, which produces mineral water retention in the tissues, making it very appropriate in the case of cardiovascular diseases.
  • Fiber :
    Soy contains 9.3% fiber, helping to regulate bowel movements and reduce cholesterol.

ا فبراير 2010

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